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Centenary Institute - Medical Research
Centenary Institute - Medical Research

SMH article – featuring A/Prof Jodie Ingles

Associate Professor Jodie Ingles leads our Clinical Cardiac Genetics Laboratory. She was interviewed for a cardiovascular focused health feature in the Sydney Morning Herald.

A/Prof Ingles wants to better understand unexplained cardiac arrest in young people – to help solve the mystery of why people such as Esther (featured in the article) suffer from heart problems at such a young age.

Read the Sydney Morning Herald feature here to find out more about Esther and the devastating impacts of heart disease.

And find out more about Jodie here.

New Centenary Institute laboratory launched

The Centenary Institute has officially launched its newest initiative, ‘The David Richmond Laboratory for Cardiovascular Development: Gene Regulation and Editing’ headed up by Associate Professor Mathias Francois (pictured).

A/Prof Francois and his team will be focused on identifying new and innovative therapeutic approaches targeting vascular disease (any abnormal condition relating to arteries, capillaries, veins and lymphatic vessels). Abnormalities in the growth and development of these vessels are associated with human disorders including cardiovascular illness, solid cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases.

With many of these diseases and disorders having a genetic cause, the team will be looking to determine the molecular events that direct and influence the construction of the ‘vascular tree’ (the network of blood and lymph vessels throughout the body). The aim will be the identification of molecular targets to which novel therapeutics can be first assessed and then generated.

The main focus of the research program will revolve around the biology of a class of protein known as transcription factors (TFs). These proteins act as molecular switches or as the control panel of the genome to turn on and off genetic pathways which drive vascular development.

Until recently TFs were labelled as “undruggable” but recent technology advances have opened up new research directions to efficiently manipulate these targets pharmacologically. The long term goal is to design new treatments that fine-tune gene expression to improve the management of vascular disorders.

Undertaking a highly strategic methodology to this activity, the new laboratory’s research program will be multi-disciplinary in nature, encompassing developmental biology, disease model systems, complemented by biophysics and genomics approaches.

“I’m extremely excited to be joining such a well-regarded and thriving organisation as the Centenary Institute,” says A/Prof Francois. “The appeal of this institution is in the versatility of the research capabilities provided by such world-class scientists.”

“Working in a new research environment with new colleagues from complementary research fields will mean new ideas and more opportunities to think out of the box. This process is  critical to translate knowledge generated from discovery science to more applied vascular research, which hopefully will lead into meaningful treatments that have the potential to change lives,” he says.

Centenary researchers receive cardiovascular disease grants totalling $2.25m

Three Centenary Institute researchers based in Sydney have been awarded grants totalling $2.25m that will help support the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

The highly competitive grants, from the first round of the NSW Cardiovascular Disease Research Capacity Building Program, were awarded to Centenary Institute’s Professor Christopher Semsarian (left), Professor Jennifer Gamble and Dr Richard Bagnall (right).

Professor Christopher Semsarian, awarded a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Clinician Scientist Grant’ was happy to receive the funding, noting that the grant would support his research into identifying new genetic causes of inherited heart diseases, including that of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young.

“We want to find the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for these life-threatening heart diseases, to provide answers to families as to why their child died suddenly and how can we help prevent these inherited heart diseases from claiming other family members as well as individuals from across the wider community,” he said.

Professor Jennifer Gamble, who was awarded a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Senior Scientist Grant’ will use her funding to explore molecular changes in endothelial cells as they undergo cellular ageing.

“Endothelial cells line blood vessels and changes in their function and structure can result in leaky blood vessels and a chronic inflammatory state,” said Prof Gamble. “These changes contribute to the initiation and progression of age-associated disease including cardiovascular disease. We need to find out what’s happening with these cells at a deeper level as an essential first step to developing potential new therapeutics.”

Dr Richard Bagnall who also received a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Senior Scientist Grant’, will use the funding to support his molecular biology and bioinformatics work into developing improved genetic testing for inherited heart diseases.

“High volumes of DNA sequencing data can now be generated, but it requires sophisticated software and computers to make sense of all that information,” said Dr Bagnall. “I’ll be undertaking a computational analysis of gene sequencing, followed up by laboratory analysis, so that we can precisely identify specific cardiovascular diseases, aiding future diagnostic and treatment approaches.”

Read the full media release here.

NSW Health Article: Professor Chris Semsarian

Professor Chris Semsarian, Head of Centenary Institute’s ‘Molecular Cardiology Program’ is featured in a NSW Health article. It highlights the advanced work that is being undertaken by researchers to better understand the heart and to treat cardiovascular disease.

Work by Professor Semsarian has shown that sudden cardiac deaths in young people are often due to genetic or inherited defects. His focus is on using genetic information to improve diagnosis, to initiate prevention and treatment strategies early in life and to help improve prognosis.

You can read more about Professor Semsarian, what inspires him as well as activities from other leading cardiologists here: https://www.medicalresearch.nsw.gov.au/scientists-solving-mysteries-of-the-heart/