Centenary researchers receive cardiovascular disease grants totalling $2.25m

05/08/2019

Three Centenary Institute researchers based in Sydney have been awarded grants totalling $2.25m that will help support the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

The highly competitive grants, from the first round of the NSW Cardiovascular Disease Research Capacity Building Program, were awarded to Centenary Institute’s Professor Christopher Semsarian (left), Professor Jennifer Gamble and Dr Richard Bagnall (right).

Professor Christopher Semsarian, awarded a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Clinician Scientist Grant’ was happy to receive the funding, noting that the grant would support his research into identifying new genetic causes of inherited heart diseases, including that of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young.

“We want to find the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for these life-threatening heart diseases, to provide answers to families as to why their child died suddenly and how can we help prevent these inherited heart diseases from claiming other family members as well as individuals from across the wider community,” he said.

Professor Jennifer Gamble, who was awarded a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Senior Scientist Grant’ will use her funding to explore molecular changes in endothelial cells as they undergo cellular ageing.

“Endothelial cells line blood vessels and changes in their function and structure can result in leaky blood vessels and a chronic inflammatory state,” said Prof Gamble. “These changes contribute to the initiation and progression of age-associated disease including cardiovascular disease. We need to find out what’s happening with these cells at a deeper level as an essential first step to developing potential new therapeutics.”

Dr Richard Bagnall who also received a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Senior Scientist Grant’, will use the funding to support his molecular biology and bioinformatics work into developing improved genetic testing for inherited heart diseases.

“High volumes of DNA sequencing data can now be generated, but it requires sophisticated software and computers to make sense of all that information,” said Dr Bagnall. “I’ll be undertaking a computational analysis of gene sequencing, followed up by laboratory analysis, so that we can precisely identify specific cardiovascular diseases, aiding future diagnostic and treatment approaches.”

Read the full media release here.

Latest News

Dr Michael Mosley delivers Centenary Institute Oration

Dr Michael Mosley has delivered the Centenary Institute Oration to more than 1000 researchers and members of the public.

New Centenary Institute laboratory launched

The Centenary Institute has officially launched ‘The David Richmond Laboratory for Cardiovascular Development: Gene Regulation and Editing’

Centenary Institute research boost with NHMRC Investigator Grants

Centenary Institute researchers have been awarded prestigious NHMRC Investigator Grants.

 

News Topics

ALL NEWS

 


Sign up for our latest News

//