Spirit of a community raising funds to help save lives

Community Fundraising Centenary Institute

27/03/2019

Pictured above: The Melonheads Team which is made up of family and friends of Aaiden Bellingham. Earlier this year they all competed and raised funds in the annual Bellingham Cup (Melonhead was a nickname given to Aaiden by his Pop). 

Centenary’s Molecular Cardiology Program led by Professor Chris Semsarian AM, extend a huge thank you to all those involved with the recent Bellingham Cup held in honour of Aaiden Bellingham – a much loved young man who was sadly taken from his family and friends as a result of a sudden cardiac episode.

Our thoughts are always with Aaiden’s family and his friends and the Bellingham Cup is a not only a wonderful tribute to Aaiden, but an invaluable way to spread the word about the importance of medical research in the area of sudden cardiac death in the young.

Special mentions to Adrian, Aaiden’s dad for his drive and determination to raise awareness and funds for the Centenary Institute. To the UC Pumas FC and all from the Club who were involved with the event and the SES Belconnen Unit for enabling the Cup’s outstanding success.

On behalf of the Bellingham Cup and Centenary, a thank you to some of the supporters who contributed to the success of the day ACT Cancer Council, Gatorade, Bunnings Belconnen and Mars Wrigley.

The photographs of the event enable us to share with all our followers and supporters the spirit of the Bellingham Cup.

Congratulations to all involved. Thank you for the much needed funds raised from the Cup and we look forward to the 2020 event.

Read more about the Molecular Cardiology Program.

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