Home > Support Us > Current Appeals
Help fight allergy - Medical Research

Current Appeals

Is there any greater investment than in the future of human health?

Allergic diseases are among the fastest growing chronic health conditions in Australia.

Many diseases and conditions that affect human health have been cured or overcome as a result of medical research. Sometimes the result of a single ground-breaking finding, but in most cases the result of decades of dedicated chipping away at the unknown.

There is currently no cure. Will you help us change this?

Inflammation is increasingly being found to play crucial roles in the initiation and progression of most major diseases including, Alzheimer’s, heart disease, cancer, respiratory diseases, diabetes and tuberculosis.

For baby Marlow and her parents, research is their only hope.

At 12-weeks-old this innocent little girl screamed all day. She refused to be held, or even touched. She wouldn’t wear clothes. The only thing her mum could do for her daughter was strip her naked, and cover her in cold wet towels.

Donate to Medical Research

Supporting research today will change lives tomorrow

More scientists, doing more research, means outcomes will be faster. But we can’t do it without you.

Many diseases and conditions that affect human health have been cured or overcome as a result of medical research. Sometimes the result of a single ground-breaking finding, but in most cases the result of decades of dedicated chipping away at the unknown.

Your help can accelerate our research and help save lives

A lifetime in medical research has filled me with confidence that eventually the horrors of cancer, stroke, dementia and heart disease can be overcome. It’s not a case of “if”, it is just a matter of “when”.

Please imagine a world in which we live long and healthy lives – free from the pain and fear of chronic diseases. The first step toward realising that vision is to gain a fundamental understanding of diseases – the causes and effects, the intricacies and complexities. This is the knowledge from which new diagnostics and treatments arise, and from which the tools to prevent are forged.

Centenary discovery could save the sight of millions

Globally, 415 million adults were living with diabetes in 2015 and this figure is predicted to rise to 642 million by 2040, representing approximately 10% of the world’s population aged between 20 and 79.

Our team in our Vascular Biology Program are excited to have developed a new drug, known as CD5-2, that could potentially treat diabetic retinopathy, a condition that leads to vision loss.

Read more on this exciting discovery.

1 in 4 people worldwide are dying from conditions caused by thrombosis.

A group of international researchers, led by three from Centenary, now has a better understanding of how blood clots are formed. The results of their study have recently been published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal eLife. The development has the potential to be life-changing for many Australians.

You can read about the outcome of the study and why this area of research is so important.

//