Home > Grants
Centenary Institute - Medical Research
Centenary Institute - Medical Research

Cardiovascular research excellence recognised

Four scientists from the Centenary Institute have had their world-leading research recognised by being awarded prestigious NSW Cardiovascular Research Capacity Building Grants. The grants will help drive the scientists work focused on improving the health of patients with heart and cardiovascular conditions.

“Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death and disability in Australia. We need to continue to accelerate our research efforts in this critical health area to develop new and innovative treatments and to improve the heart health of all Australians,” says Professor Mathew Vadas AO, Executive Director at the Centenary Institute.

“Accordingly, these grants are an excellent outcome, both for our scientists who are operating at the very forefront of their research fields, as well as for the wider community who will ultimately benefit from the life-changing medical research being undertaken,” he says.

Successful Centenary Institute scientists and their research are (pictured top left to right):

Professor Philip Hogg. Centenary Institute (ACRF Centenary Cancer Research Centre) and University of Sydney. Awarded a Cardiovascular Senior Researcher Grant. Redefining protein function in thrombosis: Implications for pro-thrombotic states and anti-thrombotic drug resistance in patients with cardiovascular disease.

Dr Paul Coleman. Centenary Institute (Vascular Biology Program), Heart Research Institute and University of Sydney. Awarded a Cardiovascular Early-Mid Career Researcher Grant. Redox control of VWF processing and activity during thrombotic diseases.

Dr Renjing Liu. Centenary Institute (Vascular Biology Program) and University of Sydney. Awarded a Cardiovascular Early-Mid Career Researcher Grant. Targeting Tet2 as a therapy for vascular calcification.

Dr Yanfei (Jacob) Qi. Centenary Institute (Vascular Biology Program) and University of Sydney. Awarded a Cardiovascular Early-Mid Career Researcher Grant. Targeting blood vessel cells to treat atherosclerosis.

The NSW Cardiovascular Disease Research Capacity Building Program and its grants are a NSW Government initiative aiming to drive discoveries that allow researchers to find ways to better diagnose, treat and prevent cardiovascular disease, improving the health and wellbeing of people living in NSW.

Read the full media release here.

Centenary Institute receives Cancer Council NSW grants

Cancer Council NSW has awarded funding to 14 ground-breaking cancer research projects including three to the Centenary Institute.

Successful Centenary Institute recipients and their research initiatives are:

Professor Geoff McCaughan, Head of the Centenary Institute Liver Injury and Cancer Program. Project: A new approach to target liver cancer.

“Liver cancer is one of the deadliest cancers and is the sixth leading cause of cancer death in Australia. Current therapies for advanced liver cancer are limited and generally only grant a few months of added survival time for the patient. This project will investigate the use of combination therapies for treating liver cancer – an approach which has not yet been widely investigated. We will be using two potential new drug treatments that will target the cancer cells, the surrounding blood vessels and the immune system within the tumour,” said Professor McCaughan

Professor John Rasko AO, Head of the Centenary Institute Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Program and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. Project: Monitoring and predicting clinical response to immunotherapy against pancreatic cancer and asbestos-induced lung cancer.

“Pancreatic cancer and mesothelioma (asbestos-induced lung cancer) are among those cancers currently lacking effective treatments, resulting in poor outcomes with five-year survival rates of less than 10%. More than 3,000 and 700 new cases of pancreatic cancer and mesothelioma, respectively, are annually diagnosed in Australia. This project will use the body’s killer immune cells (T-cells) and endow them with the information as to how to recognise and attack cancer cells (an approach known as chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy),” said Professor Rasko.

Dr Ulf Schmitz, Head of the Centenary Institute Computational BioMedicine Laboratory within the Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Program and University of Sydney. Project: Deciphering the cross-talk between microRNAs and retained introns in cancer gene regulation.

“This project will investigate a regulatory process known as ‘intron retention’, in both breast cancer and leukaemia. The process allows unwanted ‘junk DNA’ to enter the cell and interfere with other regulatory processes. Intron retention has been found to play a critical role in cancer development, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. Computer models and experimental methods will be used to establish how this process works, potentially opening up an entirely new field of cancer research,” said Dr Schmitz.

The Centenary Institute wishes to thank Cancer Council NSW for their support of our researchers who continue to pursue life-changing and life-saving medical research.

Full details of all successful Cancer Council NSW grants are available online here.

$3m to strengthen Centenary Institute research

World-class study into inherited heart disease as well as Alzheimer’s disease have been boosted after two Centenary Institute researchers successfully secured a total of $3m in highly competitive National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding.

Associate Professor Jodie Ingles, Head of the Institute’s Clinical Cardiac Genetics Group in the Molecular Cardiology Program (pictured left), was awarded a Clinical Trials and Cohort Studies Grant in excess of $2m. This will fund a five-year study into inherited cardiomyopathies involving approximately 2,500 participants. The cohort of participants will be comprehensively investigated and followed over time, making this an extremely unique and important resource for better understanding these diseases.

“Inherited cardiomyopathies such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy affect the heart muscle and are passed on genetically in families. There can be important health implications, including a risk of heart failure and sudden cardiac death,” says A/Prof Ingles.

“There are many aspects of how we manage and treat inherited cardiomyopathies that are not well understood. Our study will follow participants over time to gain critical clinical and genetic insights. In doing so, we can then provide tailored advice regarding management, treatments, prognosis and family screening regarding the disease,” she says.

Professor Jenny Gamble, Head of the Vascular Biology Program at the Centenary Institute was awarded an Ideas Grant of just under $1m. The grant will fund research into Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Supported by secondary Chief Investigator Doctor Ka Ka Ting also from the Centenary Institute, the research program will focus on the blood vessels of the brain and their potential role in Alzheimer’s development and progression.

“Alzheimer’s disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disease that is on the rise due to our ageing population. Although we don’t know yet what causes the disease it is thought that changes to the blood vessels in the brain are the earliest sign of Alzheimer’s and actually predispose the patient to the development of the disease,” says Professor Gamble.

“This grant will support our work on investigating the cells that form the barrier between the blood and the tissues, endothelial cells. We have identified significant age-related changes in these cells.  We want to determine if the breakdown and dysfunction of these cells with age actually leads to, or makes Alzheimer’s Disease more likely. If this is the case, our work will open the door to an entirely new approach to combatting the disease,” she says.

In addition to the two Grants, the Centenary Institute’s Laura Yeates received a NHMRC Postgraduate Scholarship for her study into ‘Caring for families affected by sudden cardiac death of a young relative due to genetic heart disease.’ Centenary’s Natalia Pinello also received a NHMRC Postgraduate Scholarship for her study into ‘RNA 5-hydroxymethylation in Haemopoiesis and Leukaemia.’

Read the full media release here.

Centenary Institute research boost with NHMRC Investigator Grants

Professor Philip Hansbro, Deputy Director at the Centenary Institute and Professor John Rasko AO, Head of the Centenary Institute’s Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Program have both been awarded prestigious National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Investigator Grants. The Investigator Grants scheme is one of the NHMRC’s new flagship funding arrangements supporting outstanding health and medical researchers.

Professor Philip Hansbro’s funding will support further research into the development of new preventions and treatments for chronic respiratory diseases.

“Respiratory diseases are among the leading causes of all deaths world-wide,” says Professor Hansbro.

“This grant will fund our research into developing a comprehensive ‘molecular map’ for specific respiratory diseases including Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), lung cancer and severe asthma. This will increase our knowledge of how these diseases develop and progress, providing us with new opportunities to attempt treatments and cures.”

Professor John Rasko AO, Head of the Centenary Institute’s Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Program and Head of Department, Cell & Molecular Therapies at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital will receive funding for his research focused on driving clinical cell and gene therapy in Australia.

“Harnessing the power of our body’s own cells and genetic therapies, we are witnessing a medical revolution in curing serious diseases including hereditary bleeding and anaemia as well as specific forms of cancer. This new federal funding will facilitate our internationally acclaimed basic and clinical research Program designed to improve the health of Australians”, says Professor Rasko.

Read the full media release here.

Centenary researchers receive cardiovascular disease grants totalling $2.25m

Three Centenary Institute researchers based in Sydney have been awarded grants totalling $2.25m that will help support the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

The highly competitive grants, from the first round of the NSW Cardiovascular Disease Research Capacity Building Program, were awarded to Centenary Institute’s Professor Christopher Semsarian (left), Professor Jennifer Gamble and Dr Richard Bagnall (right).

Professor Christopher Semsarian, awarded a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Clinician Scientist Grant’ was happy to receive the funding, noting that the grant would support his research into identifying new genetic causes of inherited heart diseases, including that of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young.

“We want to find the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for these life-threatening heart diseases, to provide answers to families as to why their child died suddenly and how can we help prevent these inherited heart diseases from claiming other family members as well as individuals from across the wider community,” he said.

Professor Jennifer Gamble, who was awarded a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Senior Scientist Grant’ will use her funding to explore molecular changes in endothelial cells as they undergo cellular ageing.

“Endothelial cells line blood vessels and changes in their function and structure can result in leaky blood vessels and a chronic inflammatory state,” said Prof Gamble. “These changes contribute to the initiation and progression of age-associated disease including cardiovascular disease. We need to find out what’s happening with these cells at a deeper level as an essential first step to developing potential new therapeutics.”

Dr Richard Bagnall who also received a ‘Cardiovascular Disease Senior Scientist Grant’, will use the funding to support his molecular biology and bioinformatics work into developing improved genetic testing for inherited heart diseases.

“High volumes of DNA sequencing data can now be generated, but it requires sophisticated software and computers to make sense of all that information,” said Dr Bagnall. “I’ll be undertaking a computational analysis of gene sequencing, followed up by laboratory analysis, so that we can precisely identify specific cardiovascular diseases, aiding future diagnostic and treatment approaches.”

Read the full media release here.