Pathway to eliminating antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis in the Pacific

01/07/2020

Australian researchers, including from the Centenary Institute have been awarded funding for a major project that aims to eliminate both active and latent tuberculosis (TB) found on Kiribati, an island nation in the central Pacific Ocean. The project will also support multidrug-resistant TB control education and management through the Pacific region.

Led by Professor Barend Marais of the University of Sydney, Professor Warwick Britton AO, Head of the Centenary Institute’s Tuberculosis Research Program will be a Chief Investigator (CIB) on the project with colleagues from the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Tuberculosis Control.

“A TB hotspot, Kiribati has extremely high rates of tuberculosis. The capital Tarawa, one of the most densely populated areas in the Pacific, has a TB incidence rate among the highest in the world,” said Professor Britton.

“Our project will ensure that every person over the age of 2 will be screened for TB disease or infection in Tarawa with appropriate treatment strategies then implemented. Our integrated project will also provide a pathway towards drug resistant TB prevention and TB elimination  more broadly within the Pacific, through a program of training and mentoring.”

“Overall, this program will be a catalyst in regional TB elimination efforts, helping save lives and overcoming a disease which has devastating impact on communities,” he said.

The Federal Government’s announcement regarding the project funding can be accessed online.

TB is a leading cause of death globally responsible for approximately 1.5 million deaths annually.

Read more about Professor Britton and his research here.

Image Credit: Vladimir Lysenko. https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=39278217

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