International Women’s Day event

09/03/2020

Dr Jessamy Tiffen from the Centenary Institute’s Melanoma Immunology and Oncology Program has participated in a special ‘Women in Education’ event held at Pymble Ladies College, Sydney.

Aligned with International Women’s Day, Dr Tiffen was an invited panel member at the event which was focused on inspiring female students as to the amazing wealth of opportunities and options available to women in the workplace.

Discussion, in a panel style Q&A format, covered the topics of women and education, leadership, potential discrimination and how to overcome it, as well as the importance of dreaming big for the future and setting achievable goals.

“It was absolutely fantastic to share my knowledge, issues I’ve experienced as a woman, as well to discuss my personal life and career journey to this group of incredibly interested students. There was genuine enthusiasm for what we were saying as panellists and some very insightful questions asked by these young women who are soon to embark on the next phase of their lives,” said Dr Tiffen.

Panel members at the event also included Dr Kate Hadwen, Principal, Pymble Ladies College and Caroline Gurney, Managing Director, Marketing & Communications, Asia Pacific, UBS. The panel moderator was Caroline Overington, Associate Editor, The Australian.

The ‘Women in Education’ event featured in the Australian newspaper and can be viewed here.

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